BBC to Include More Religious Shows

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The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) vowed to include more religious-themed shows in its programming.

In an effort to “raise our game,” BBC would create a global religious affairs team to focus on producing shows relevant to all faiths. This, following the corporation’s year-long review that suggested a wider coverage of religion and ethics.

“They recognize that, if we truly want to make sense of the world, we need to understand the systems of belief that underpin it,” he said.

The BBC currently has several programs such as Muslims Like Us and Boy with the Top Knot that tells stories of people from different faiths. Director general Tony Hall revealed that their audience expressed interest in learning more about religion.

“They recognize that, if we truly want to make sense of the world, we need to understand the systems of belief that underpin it,” he said.

Graham James, the bishop of Norwich, said, “We look forward to seeing how [the BBC’s] commitment to first-class coverage of religious affairs develops in its sophistication and scope in the months and years ahead.”

The corporation identified the efforts it will undertake to have a well-rounded programming on religion. Programs to “explore religion in all its forms,” will include a major TV series about religious sites all over the world and a radio series on morality.

Non-Christian festivals like Ramadan, Diwali, and Passover will be discussed in primetime talk shows. To engage the younger audience, there will be comedy shows, musicals and digital-first videos.

The corporation will retain its Thought For The Day, a short slot on Radio 4’s Today program reflecting on the latest issues and people in the news.

Several faith groups lauded the BBC’s plan to increase its religious programming, reports The Guardian.

Graham James, the bishop of Norwich, said, “We look forward to seeing how [the BBC’s] commitment to first-class coverage of religious affairs develops in its sophistication and scope in the months and years ahead.”

“The BBC’s research has shown that the public realize that we need to understand other faiths in order to live together peacefully in our world,” said Jan McFarlane, the bishop of Repton and chair of the Sandford St Martin Trust.

The Board of Deputies of British Jews and Mona Siddiqui, a professor of Islamic studies at Edinburgh University also commended BBC for its initiative.

Sources:
BBC
The Guardian

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Joyce Dimaculangan
Joyce has more than 15 years experience writing news, industry articles and blogs for the private and public sectors. Most of her career was spent writing technical documentation for a software company in the Philippines. She earned a B.A. in Communication Arts with a concentration in writing from the University of the Philippines, Los Baños. During her leisure time, Joyce pursues her interest in reading fiction and playing with her dogs. She can be contacted at Joyce@onechristianvoice.com.